Question re burning a CD

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mjzee
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2008 5:20 pm

Question re burning a CD

Post by mjzee »

I own a CD that has 14 tracks, and was recorded by the record company at a very low volume. I would like to normalize each track to an appropriate volume, then burn those tracks to a CD. How can I create this CD in Amadeus?

mjzee
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2008 5:20 pm

Figured it out

Post by mjzee »

I've just figured it out on my own. The steps:
1) Open the tracks in Amadeus and normalize.
2) Save each one to a folder on the desktop.
3) Drag the tracks into Toast Titanium.
4) Rip the CD using Toast.

pm@philxmilstein.com
Posts: 112
Joined: Sun Nov 12, 2006 6:55 pm

Question re burning a CD

Post by pm@philxmilstein.com »

I've just figured it out on my own. The steps:
1) Open the tracks in Amadeus and normalize.
2) Save each one to a folder on the desktop.
3) Drag the tracks into Toast Titanium.
4) Rip the CD using Toast.
You might do better using the Sound > Join Files function. This will allow
you to easily group all of the album's files into a single indexed file.
Normalizing them as a single unit will retain their relative amplitude
values, whereas normalizing them one-by-one will lose that.

The companion function of Sound > Split According To Markers will then all
you to export them back into individual files, when you can then burn to
disc.

mjzee
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2008 5:20 pm

Post by mjzee »

OK, but I'd still need a different program, such as Toast, to create an audio CD of all the tracks, correct?

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Martin Hairer
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Question re burning a CD

Post by Martin Hairer »

OK, but I'd still need a different program, such as Toast, to create an audio CD of all the tracks, correct?
You can also use the "Burn to CD" function from the "Sound" menu.
Regards,

Martin

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http://www.hairersoft.com/

mjzee
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2008 5:20 pm

Post by mjzee »

Thanks to all. These are good tips that will save me time and effort. As pm said, normalizing the joined file will retain the tracks' relative amplitude. However, sometimes the amplitude variations from track to track can be large and can degrade the listening experience. In that case, I can normalize each individual track, save them to a folder on the desktop, then join those files and burn to CD.

CDJonah
Posts: 119
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 12:10 am

Question re burning a CD

Post by CDJonah »

One comment -- you may not really want to normalize all tracks,
depending on what is in them. for example, if one track has a very
short loud section, and another track is all pretty much at the same
volume, then listening to the constant volume section will feel like you
are really being slammed. I would have thought that the original CD
would have had levels appropriate to the music; a quiet lullaby and a
party song really should be at different levels, but as it was all done
at a low level, the assumption that care was used on the original CD may
be an invalid assumption.

Chuk

On 3/30/16 9:35 AM, mjzee wrote:
Thanks to all. These are good tips that will save me time and effort. As pm said, normalizing the joined file will retain the tracks' relative amplitude. However, sometimes the amplitude variations from track to track can be large and can degrade the listening experience. In that case, I can normalize each individual track, save them to a folder on the desktop, then join those files and burn to CD.





pm@philxmilstein.com
Posts: 112
Joined: Sun Nov 12, 2006 6:55 pm

Question re burning a CD

Post by pm@philxmilstein.com »

Right. I was meaning if the original disc was of a singular album, where the
tracks had all been mastered as pieces-of-a-whole.


Charles Jonah wrote:
One comment -- you may not really want to normalize all tracks,
depending on what is in them. for example, if one track has a very
short loud section, and another track is all pretty much at the same
volume, then listening to the constant volume section will feel like you
are really being slammed. I would have thought that the original CD
would have had levels appropriate to the music; a quiet lullaby and a
party song really should be at different levels, but as it was all done
at a low level, the assumption that care was used on the original CD may
be an invalid assumption.

Chuk

On 3/30/16 9:35 AM, mjzee wrote:
Thanks to all. These are good tips that will save me time and effort. As pm
said, normalizing the joined file will retain the tracks' relative amplitude.
However, sometimes the amplitude variations from track to track can be large
and can degrade the listening experience. In that case, I can normalize each
individual track, save them to a folder on the desktop, then join those files
and burn to CD.






mjzee
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Mar 22, 2008 5:20 pm

Post by mjzee »

CD & PM: Quite right. This particular CD is Art Tatum - The V-Discs (Black Lion), issued in 1988. The material is obviously much older than that. The CD was mastered at a very low volume, so it all needed to be boosted, but given the nature of the varied sources, some needed to be boosted more than others. FYI, re the reason why I needed to burn it back onto a CD: I'm in the process of reviewing which albums I had ripped to iTunes in the early days at 192 kbps, and re-ripping them using Apple Lossless. However, I don't want to lose the information I've entered (musicians, recording dates) or the play count. In order to achieve this, iTunes seems to need to rip the material from a CD; if I do this from a file on my computer, iTunes won't see it as the same tune I'm trying to replace, but rather as a new tune.

millahjovich
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:00 am

Post by millahjovich »

Thanks to all. These are good tips that will save me time and effort. As pm said, normalizing the joined file will retain the tracks' relative amplitude. However, sometimes the amplitude variations from track to track can be large and can degrade the listening experience. In that case, I can normalize each individual track, save them to a folder on the desktop, then join those files and burn to CD.

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