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De-echoing my studio closet

 
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Jemel



Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:53 pm    Post subject: De-echoing my studio closet Reply with quote

I'm looking for ideas that will help me to make my little studio a better sound chamber for recording.

It has 2 walls that are 9 inch thick poured cement, one wall to an adjoining room, and a wooden door and regular wall on the fourth side. I've draped a porous bedspread over the door. I have lots of boxes in the closet. The floor is carpeted.

I'm using an Olympus LS-10 recorder with stereo mics, windscreens, and mic set to "standard."

With the door closed, I can hear when there are outside noises, but my recorder does not pick them up.

I have a slight echo on the recordings I make.

Do you have any suggestions for reducing the echo?

Thanks,
Jemel
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Gerard Bik



Joined: 10 Nov 2006
Posts: 353

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 11:10 am    Post subject: De-echoing my studio closet Reply with quote

Putting foam everywhere is one way.

Can't find it right now, but I read a webpage about recording on location, where the mic was put in a small box isolated an all sides except the front.
That way most echo's can't get back to the mic.

Experiment!
Gerard

Quote:
I'm looking for ideas that will help me to make my little studio a better sound chamber for recording.

It has 2 walls that are 9 inch thick poured cement, one wall to an adjoining room, and a wooden door and regular wall on the fourth side. I've draped a porous bedspread over the door. I have lots of boxes in the closet. The floor is carpeted.

I'm using an Olympus LS-10 recorder with stereo mics, windscreens, and mic set to "standard."

With the door closed, I can hear when there are outside noises, but my recorder does not pick them up.

I have a slight echo on the recordings I make.

Do you have any suggestions for reducing the echo?

Thanks,
Jemel




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Gerard Bik



Joined: 10 Nov 2006
Posts: 353

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 11:12 am    Post subject: De-echoing my studio closet Reply with quote

http://www.jakeludington.com/podcasting/20080130_diy_portable_recording_studio.html



Quote:
I'm looking for ideas that will help me to make my little studio a better sound chamber for recording.

It has 2 walls that are 9 inch thick poured cement, one wall to an adjoining room, and a wooden door and regular wall on the fourth side. I've draped a porous bedspread over the door. I have lots of boxes in the closet. The floor is carpeted.

I'm using an Olympus LS-10 recorder with stereo mics, windscreens, and mic set to "standard."

With the door closed, I can hear when there are outside noises, but my recorder does not pick them up.

I have a slight echo on the recordings I make.

Do you have any suggestions for reducing the echo?

Thanks,
Jemel




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Amadeus forum mailing list
Unsubscribe / change settings at http://two.pairlist.net/mailman/listinfo/forum_list


--
______________________ _
Gerard Bik grafische vormgeving
Van Aerssenstraat 263
2582 JM Den Haag
070 3554081
_______________________________________________
Amadeus forum mailing list
Unsubscribe / change settings at http://two.pairlist.net/mailman/listinfo/forum_list
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Jemel



Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 3:03 pm    Post subject: Re: De-echoing my studio closet Reply with quote

Thanks Gerard,

That box is a fascinating invention. I might be able to use it. I stand, though, I don't sit. I put my recorder on a small tripod which I have taped to an analog mic stand.

Yes, I'll keep experimenting. I have 30 (and counting!) test recordings, each documented with the changes I've made.

Thanks for your suggestions.

Jemel
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rfwilmut



Joined: 17 Nov 2006
Posts: 255

PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 8:30 am    Post subject: Re: De-echoing my studio closet Reply with quote

Putting a box beind the microphone is likely to cause significant mid-range colouration. Your best bet is to treat the walls. You won't be able to get rid of lower-frequency resonance - this is quite difficult to do - but you can reduce mid-range reverberation. Foam plastic is useful - covering it with a curtain is also a good idea: it needs to be at least one-quarter-wavelength thick to affect any particular frequency: one to two inches would be fairly useful: it doesn't all have to be the same.

Bookshelves with books on will break the sound up and deaden it nicely. Cork tiles will also reduce higher-frequency reflections, though not midrange, and another useful trick is to use egg-boxes (the shaped cardboard that a dozen eggs come in - if they haven't gone over to plastic).

Don't cover the entire walls with the same thing; and leave some reflective surfaces or the sound will start to get muffled. Another trick is to use pegboard or slotboard (if you can still get it - hardboard with holes in it) and place it with foam plastic behind to maintain the higher frequencies.

A nice thick carpet is also obviously a good idea.

Low frequencies can only be reduced by the use of resonators, and frankly it's too difficult to do to be worth bothering, particularly when only speech is involved.
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Jemel



Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 5:15 pm    Post subject: Re: De-echoing my studio closet Reply with quote

Thanks, rfwilmut, for your very helpful post. I know that I will refer to it often as I continue to experiment. I only make one change at a time and then test.

Thanks,
Jemel
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Balzypipes



Joined: 30 Jun 2007
Posts: 4
Location: Milwaukie, OR

PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:54 pm    Post subject: Cheap sound treatment Reply with quote

My studio isn't designed for music creation, I'm a television announcer and we do voice over here but I've picked up some things about deadening sound.

I have some really expensive custom made acoustical treatment panels but I still had a couple areas that were too "live" sounding. Not wanting to spend more $$ than necessary, I found a really affordable way to do it.

Most people use "Sonex" or "Auralux" panels. http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Auralex-Studiofoam-Designer-Kit?sku=422602
These are about $100 to do 32 square feet.

I bought foam from a company that makes packing for electronic items to be shipped.
http://www.uline.com/Product/ProductDetail.aspx?model=S-8510&ref=2353
They are 2' x 2' and cheap, although you have to buy quite a few of them. You can do 72 square feet for $140 bucks. No it isn't the quality of the spendy stuff, but no one who hears your recordings will know that.
NOTE: I think this stuff is flammable, so don't allow cigarettes in your booth!
Good luck.
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voicecoop



Joined: 27 Sep 2010
Posts: 5
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 5:55 pm    Post subject: get in the corner Reply with quote

Put the mike a few feet from a corner and then the reflected sound will bounce away from the mike. Felt is great too, not the crappy polyester, the real wool felt - it eats sound, I cover my copy stand with it. To kill echoes, make sure everything behind you is padded with some good foam or carpet on the walls, but leave a bit of hard surface here and there.

What you record is determined by (1) your voice (2) your mic, preamp, and ADDA and (3) your booth. All work together.
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